What do NetApp ONTAP and Symantec NetBackup have in common?

A friend of mine forwarded this link to the interview SearchStorage.com recently did with Dave Hitz, one of the founders of NetApp. It is an interesting read and the major topic is the new clustering capabilities in OnTap 8. When he was asked about EMC’s Isilon, I found his response to hit a home run.

“If you look at features EMC can support, you end up with a complete list. If you break apart their architectures and look at the same feature list by architecture, you end up finding the main feature Isilon has is clustering, which is great. Unfortunately, it’s not in combination with the full suite of rich data management capabilities. That’s the No. 1 difference Ontap has — it’s the same Ontap that has all this cool stuff in it.” ,  said Dave Hitz. 

The context here is the fact that the foundational technology powering all storage systems from NetApp is ONTAP (with E-series being an outlier) and customers get the choice of footprint and features to match their workloads. EMC’s storage division, on the other hand, provides different products for overlapping set of workloads like VNX, VMAX, Isilion etc.

If you think about it, this response is applicable even when you look at other business units from EMC as well. My favorite is EMC’s Backup and Recovery Services (BRS) division. They have four different products; Avamar, Data Domain, NetWorker and HomeBase, pretty much serving the same market. If I were to fit Dave’s quote in the context of Backup and Recovery and use Symantec’s NetBackup as the competitor for EMC Backup, it would go something like this.

If you look at features EMC can support as a vendor for backup and recovery, you end up with a near-complete list. If you break apart their architectures and look at the same feature list by architecture, you end up finding that the main value Data Domain has is storage reduction at target with federation capabilities for limited application workloads. Avamar has full management capabilities but only for smaller workloads. NetWorker has decent long-term retention capabilities and track record but had been on life support. HomeBase provides Bare Metal Recovery. Unfortunately, none of these products are with a full suite of rich data management capabilities for end-to-end protection that can bring down capital and operational expenses in managing recovery points. That’s the No. 1 difference NetBackup has — it’s the same NetBackup that has all those cool stuff in one platform and a lot more innovations like managing snapshots, replicas, virtualized applications, backup acceleration etc. 

As always, the standard disclaimer applies here. This is just my opinion. Although I work for Symantec, the above statement should not be considered as the view of my employer.

 

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *