vPower: brand new solution, really?

When I started exploring AIX nearly eight years ago, there were two things that fascinated me right of the bat. I was already a certified professional for Solaris that time. I had also managed Tru64 UNIX and HP-UX mainly for Oracle workloads. Those used to be the time of tuning shared memory, message queue and semaphore parameters. During my days working as a contractor for a large financial institution and later for VERITAS/Symantec NetBackup technical support; tuning the UNIX system kernel for IPCS parameters were more of a norm than exception. AIX intrigued me because it featured a dynamic kernel! It was really a big deal for the kind of job I used to do!

The second thing that looked unique in comparison with rest of the UNIX platforms was AIX’s mksysb. In AIX, you could send the entire rootvg (all the boot files, system files and additional data file systems you may want to include in the root volume group) to a backup tape. When you need to restore your system from bare metal, you simply boot from tape medium and run the installer; your system is back to the same point in time when you did the mksysb backup. Furthermore, if needed, you can also boot from tape and restore selected files with a little help from tape positioning commands.

I went on to get certified on AIX, not just because of those two bells and whistles, but VERITAS Storage Foundation was expanding to AIX and it was a good thing to add AIX certification when we integrated its snapshot capabilities in NetBackup.

The mksysb started to become a bit obsolete for two reasons.

  1. It is expensive to have a standalone tape drive with every pSeries system. Not just because of the need for a tape drive on each system, rather the increased operational expenditure for the system administrators to manually track tapes with mksysb images for each system and also maintain a time-series catalog of all images.
  2. Enterprise data protection solutions like NetBackup added Bare Metal Restore (BMR) support. NetBackup BMR feature makes it possible to recover any physical system (be it AIX, HP-UX, Solaris, Linux, Windows…) from bare metal just by running a single command on master server to tell NetBackup that a client needs to be rebuild from bare metal. You also have the option to specify whether you need to bring the client to the most recent point in time (suitable in case of hardware failures) or a point in time from the past (suitable in case of logical corruptions that had happened before the most recent backup). After that you simply reboot the client. The client boots from network and recovers itself. The process is 100% unattended once the reboot is initiated.

What about virtual machines? You can indeed use NetBackup BMR feature on virtual machines. It is supported. The availability of deeper integration with VMware vADP and Hyper-V VSS makes it possible to perform agent-less backups of virtual machines whereby you could restore the entire VM or individual objects. Hence you don’t need it for VMs hosted by those hypervisors. You can use NetBackup BMR for VMs on other hypervisors like Citrix XenServer, IBM PowerVM, Oracle VM Server etc.  With NetBackup BMR and NetBackup Intelligent Deduplication, you have a solution no matter how many kinds of hypervisors are powering your clouds.

Why this story? Recently, during the after-party of a PR event hosted by Intel; I had a conversation with an old friend. He works for an organization who happens to be a partner for Veeam. He mentioned about Veeam and Visioncore are having a patent battle on the ability to run a system directly from the backup image. Veeam calls this feature as vPower, VisionCore calls it FlashRestore. This technology is really the virtual machine version of what IBM offered for AIX pSeries systems. You boot and run the system directly from the backup image and recover the whole system or selected files. The value additions like the flexibility to keep it running while being able to live migrate it to production storage comes from VMware’s innovative Storage vMotion technology which isn’t really something Veeam or VisionCore can take credit for. Visioncore may not have much difficulty fighting this battle.

We had a good laugh when we pulled Veeam’s marketing pitch on U-AIR which is nothing but running the VM from backup and copy required application files back to production VM over the wire. He raised his iPad to show Veeam’s datasheet to the group.

“vPower also enables quick recovery of individual objects from any virtualized application, on any OS. It’s a brand-new solution to the age-old problem of what to do when users accidentally delete important emails or scripts incorrectly update records.”

Brand new solution for the age-old problem, really?