The Big Hole in EMC Big Data backup story

It is one of the crucial roles for the marketing team in any organization to communicate the value of its products and services. It is not uncommon (pardon the double negative) for organizations to show the best side of its story while deliberately hiding the weaker aspects through fine prints. The left side of the picture below is the snapshot of breakfast cereal (General Mills’ Total) that came with my breakfast order in Sheraton while travelling on business.

EMC appears to have a Big Hole in its Big Data Backup
EMC appears to have a Big Hole in its Big Data Backup

Note that General Mills had claimed 100% of daily value of 11 vitamins and minerals but with an asterisk. The claim is true only if I consume 53g serving, but the box has only 33g!

Although I may have felt a bit taken back as a consumer, I enjoyed giving a bit of hard time to my General Mills friends and I moved on. This is a small transaction.

What if you were responsible for a transaction worth tens of thousands of dollars and were pitched a glass half-full story like this? It does happen. That General Mills cereal box is what came to my mind when I saw this blog from EMC on protecting Big Data (Teradata) workloads using EMC ‘Big Data backup solution’.

General Mills had the courtesy put the fine print that part of the vitamins and minerals are missing from its box. EMC’s blog didn’t really call out what was missing from its ‘box’ aka Data Domain device to protect Teradata workload using Teradata Data Stream Architecture. In fact it is missing the real brain of the solution: NetBackup!

First a little bit of history and some naked truth. Teradata had been working with NetBackup for over a decade to provide data protection for its workloads. In fact, Teradata sells the NetBackup Agent for Teradata for its customers. This agent pushes the data stream to NetBackup media servers. This is where the real workload aware intelligence (the real brain for this Big Data backup) is built. Once NetBackup media server receives the data stream it can store it on any supported storage: NetBackup Deduplication Pool, NetBackup Advanced Disk Pool, NetBackup OpenStorage Pool or even on a tape storage unit! When it comes to NetBackup OpenStorage Pool, it does not matter who the OpenStorage partner is; it can be EMC Data Domain, Quantum DXi,… The naked truth is that the backend devices are dumb storage devices from the view of NetBackup Agent for Teradata (the Teradata BAR component depicted in the blog).

EMC’s blog appears to have been designed to mislead the reader. It tends to imply that there is some sort of special sauce built natively into Data Domain (or Data Domain Boost) for Teradata BAR stream. The blog is trying to attach EMC to Big Data type workloads through marketing. May I say that the hole is quite big in EMC’s Big Data backup story!

I am speculating that EMC had been telling this story for a while in private engagements with clients. Note that the blog is simply displaying some of EMC’s slides that are marked ‘confidential’. The author forgot to remove it before publishing it. In closed meetings with joint customers of Teradata and NetBackup, a slide like this will create the illusion that Data Domain has something special for Teradata backup. Now the truth just leaked!