NetBackup Accelerator vs. Simpana DASH Full

I want to start this blog with a note.

I mean no disrespect to CommVault as a company or its engineers innovating its products. Being an engineer myself by trade, I do understand that innovations are triggered by market demands and there is always room for improvements in any product. This blog is entirely my own opinions.

As most of you guys reading this blog know, I also write for official Symantec blogs. I recently got an opportunity to take readers of Symantec Connect on a deep dive into one of the major features in NetBackup 7.6 for VMware vSphere and vCloud environments. It is primarily targeted for users of NetBackup who knows its nuts and bolts. A couple of employees from a CommVault read the blog. It is natural in competitive intelligence world to look for weak spots or things that can be selectively pointed out to show parity. It is part of their job and I respect it. However it appeared that they wanted to claim parity for Simpana with NetBackup Accelerator for VMware based on two statements (tweets, to be precise!). While asking to elaborate, the discussion went on a rat hole with statements made out of context and downright unprofessional. Hence here I go with an attempt to compare Simpana 10 with NetBackup 7.6 on the very topic discussed in official blog.

Claims to equate parity with NetBackup Accelerator for VMware

  1. (Not explicitly stated) Simpana supports CBT
  2. Simpana had ‘block detection’ for over a year
  3. Simpana does synthetics

The attempt here is to check all the boxes to claim parity while at times people do miss the big picture! At times they were equating apples to oranges. Hence I am going to attempt to clarify this as much as possible using Simpana language for the benefit those two employees.

Simpana supports CBT: Of course, every major vendor supports it. It is an innovation from VMware. The willingness to support a feature from vStorage APIs is important to protect VMware virtual machines.

What sets NetBackup 7.6 apart from Simpana 10 in this case is that Simpana’s implementation of CBT is limited to recovering an entire VM or individual files from the VM. If you have enterprise applications (e.g. Microsoft Exchange, Microsoft SQL Server etc.), you must stream data through an agent inside the guest to protect those applications and perform granular recovery. The value of CBT is to minimize data processing and movement load on production VMs while performing backups. A virtual machine’s operating system binaries and related files are typically static and CBT won’t add much value there. The real value comes from daily changes to disk blocks by applications! That means ZERO value in Simpana to protect enterprise applications with its implementation of vSphere CBT.

Simpana had block detection for over a year,  Simpana does synthetics: The employee is trying to add a check box for Simpana next to NetBackup’s capability to make use of Symantec V-Ray to detect deleted blocks. Nice try!

First and foremost, the block optimization technique described in my blog is present in NetBackup since 2007, with version 6.5.1 when Symantec announced support for VMware Virtual Infrastructure 3. Congratulations on trying to claim that Simpana had this capability after half a decade! But wait…. We are talking about apple and orange here.

This technique had been available for both full and incremental backup schedules. It works no matter where backups are going to, disk, deduplicated disk, tape or cloud. NetBackup’s block optimization happens closer to the data source. Thus it detects deleted blocks at the backup host so that the deleted blocks never appear in SAN or LAN traffic to the backup storage. That is optimization for processing-power, interconnect-bandwidth and storage!

CommVault employee was in a hurry to equate this to something Simpana caught up recently.  This is what I believe he is referring to. (I am asking him to tweet back if there is anything else).  Quoted from Simpana 10 online documentation.

DASH Full is a read optimized Synthetic Full operation which does not require traditional full backups to be performed. Once the first full backup is completed, changed blocks are protected during incremental or differential backups. A DASH Full will run in place of traditional full or synthetic full. This operation does not require movement of data. It will simply update indexing information and the deduplication database signifying that a full backup has been completed. This will significantly reduce the time it takes to perform full backups.

There are so many things I want to say about this, but I am trying to be concise here with bullet points.

  • What Simpana has here is an equivalent of NetBackup OpenStorage Optimized Synthetics that was introduced in NetBackup 6.5.4 (in 2009). While NetBackup still supports this capability, Symantec had taken this to the next level with NetBackup Accelerator. For the record, NetBackup Accelerator is also backed by Optimized Synthetics and hence the so-called ‘block detection’ is there in NetBackup since 2009.
  • The optimization I was talking about was the capability to detect deleted blocks from the CBT data stream while CommVault is touting about data movement within backup storage!
  • The DASH full requires incremental backups and separate schedules for synthetic backups. NetBackup Accelerator eliminates this operational inefficiency by synthesizing full image inline using the resources needed for an incremental backup.
  • If you are curious about how NetBackup Accelerator in general is different from Optimized Synthetics (or DASH Full), this blog would help.
  • Last but not the least, did I say that NetBackup Accelerator for VMware works with enterprise applications as well? Thus both CBT and deleted blocks detection (both relevant to applications that does the real work inside VM) adds real value for NetBackup Accelerator

NetBackup master server and VMware vCenter

3. The control and command center

vCenter server is the center of an enterprise vSphere environment. Although the ESXi hosts and virtual machines will continue to function even when vCenter server is down, enterprise data centers and cloud providers cannot afford such a downtime. Without vCenter server crucial operations like vMotion, VMware HA, VMware FT, DRS etc will cease to function. A number of third party applications count on plug-ins in vCenter server. A number monitoring and notification functions are governed by vCenter. Hence larger enterprises and cloud providers deploy vCenter on highly redundant systems. Some use high availability clustering solutions line Microsoft Cluster Server or VERITAS cluster server. Some deploy vCenter on a virtual machine protected by VMware HA that is run by another vCenter server.

NetBackup master server plays a similar role. It is the center of NetBackup domain. If this system goes down, you cannot do backups or restores. Unlike vCenter server which runs on Windows (and now on Linux) you can deploy master server on a variety of operating systems like Windows, enterprise flavours of Linux, AIX, HP-UX and Solaris. NetBackup includes cluster agents for Microsoft Cluster Server, VERITAS Cluster Server, IBM HACMP, HP-UX Service Guard and Sun/Oracle Cluster for free. If you have any of these HA solutions, NetBackup lets you install master server with an easy to deploy cluster installation wizard.

An enterprise vCenter server uses a database management system, usually Microsoft SQL Server, for storing its objects. NetBackup comes with Sybase ASA which is embedded in the product. This is a highly scalable application database. No need to provide a separate database management system.

In addition to Sybase ASA database, NetBackup also stores backup image metadata (index) and other configurations in binary and ASCII formats. The entire collection of Sybase ASA databases, binary image indexes and ASCII based databases is referred to as NetBackup Catalog.  NetBackup does provide you a specific kind of backup policy called Catalog backup policy to copy the entire catalog to secondary storage devices (disk or tape) easily. Thus even if you lose your master server, you can perform a catalog recovery to rebuild the master server.

In VMware, you might have dealt with vCenter Server HeartBeat. This feature provides you that capability to replicate vCenter configuration to a remote site so that you could start the replicated vCenter server at that site in case of primary site loss. NetBackup goes a bit further. Unlike vCenter HeartBeat which has Active-Passive architecture, NetBackup provides A.I.R (Auto Image Replication). When you turn on A.I.R for your backups, NetBackup appends the catalog information for the backup in the backup image itself. The images are replicated using storage device’s native replication engine. At the remote site you can have a fully functional master server (which is serving to media servers and clients locally). The device on the remote master server domain which receives A.I.R images can automatically notify the remote master. The remote master now imports the image catalog info from storage. Unlike traditional import processes where the entire image needs to be scanned for recreating the catalog remotely, this optimized import finishes in a matter of seconds (even if the backup image was several terabytes) because the catalog info is embedded within the image for quick retrieval. The result is Active-Active NetBackup domains at both sites. They could replicate in both directions and also act as the DR domain for each other. You can have many NetBackup domains replicating to a central site (fan-in), one domain replicating to multiple domains (fan-out) or a combination of both. This is why NetBackup is the data protection platform that cloud pilots need to master. It is evolving to serve clouds which typically span multiple sites.

vCenter integrates with Active Directory to provide role based access control. Similarly NetBackup provides NetBackup Access Control that can be integrated with Active Directory, LDAP, NIS and NIS+. NetBackup also features audit trails so that you can track users’ activities.

One thing that really makes NetBackup stand out from the point solutions like vRanger, Veeam etc is the ability for virtual machine owners (the application administrators) to self serve their recovery needs. For example, the Exchange administrator can use NetBackup GUI on client, authenticate himself/herself and browse Exchange objects in backups. NetBackup presents the objects directly from its catalog or live browse interface depending on the type of object being requested.  The user simply selects the object needed and initiates the restore. NetBackup does the rest. There are no complex ticket systems where the application owner makes a request to backup administrator. No need to mount an entire VM on your precious ESX resources in production just to retrieve a 1k object. No need to learn how to manipulate objects (for example, the need to manually run application tools to copy objects from a temporary VM) and face the risks associated with user errors. All the user interfaces directly connect to master server, it figures out what to restore and starts the job on a media server.

Well, so NetBackup is an enterprise platform that makes a traditional VM administrator to a cloud pilot of the future. It is nice to see that NetBackup has support for various hardware and operating systems. Is there a way to deploy a NetBackup domain without building a master server on my own? The answer is indeed yes!! NetBackup 5200 series appliances are available for you for this purpose. These appliances are built on Symantec hardware and can be deployed in a matter of minutes. Everything you need to create a NetBackup master server and/or media server is available in these appliances.

Next: Coming Soon!

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